Exploratorius Redux

Atelier Aquarell & Fotografie

Tag Archives: Seascape

Lazy Day On The Water

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Aboard the Patriot
St. Michaels Maryland — July 2016
Zeiss Ikon ZM + Voigtländer Ultron 21/1.8 ASPH II
Eastman Double-X (5222) + Diafine (stock) 3+3

Humid Morning On The Water

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Sailboats at the Annapolis Yacht Club
Annapolis, Maryland — June 2016
Zeiss Ikon ZM + Voigtländer Ultron 21/1.8 ASPH II
Eastman Double-X (5222) + Diafine (stock) 3+3

Cruising Up The Miles River

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Aboard the Patriot
St. Michaels, Maryland — July 2016
Zeiss Ikon ZM + Voigtländer Heliar 15/4.5 ASPH III
Eastman Double-X (5222) + Diafine (stock) 3+3

Warm And Sunny In The Dead Of Winter

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Mid-morning at the beach
Ocracoke Island, North Carolina — January 2014
Leica IIIf + Leica Summicron 50/2.0
Kodak Ektar 100 + Commercial C-41 processing

Big Show From Kilauea

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Lava hitting the sea
Kupapau Point, Hawaii — April 2009
Leica D-LUX 4 + 24-60mm

With all the recent news about Kilauea erupting, I thought I’d share one of the images we took of the same area almost a decade ago.

Technicolor Sunset

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Sunset at the marina
Ridge, Maryland — May 2014
Leica M 240 + Leica Tri-Elmar 16/4.0 ASPH

Sunsets on the water can be so satisfying.

Dichotomy

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Aboard the Inner Harbor water taxi
Baltimore, Maryland — July 2014
Leica M 240 + Leica Tri-Elmar 16/4.0 ASPH

I remember when the Inner Harbor was a seedy, dirty, nasty place to be — populated with equally unsavory red-light sections, head shops, used record stores, and other marginal “businesses”.  What a change!  Now it’s bright, clean, family-friendly, and a great place to visit.

The View At Mo’okini Heiau

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Thatched temple building at Mo’okini Heiau
Hawi, Hawaii — April 2009
Leica D-LUX 4 + 24-60mm

This is a thatched temple — one of many that were here at one time — and it can be found at Mo’okini Heiau, the oldest and most sacred heiau located within Hawaii.  The rest of the sacrificial temple at this location is to the right of the thatched temple, just outside of the camera frame.

Much is written about this heiau… how it was created around 480 AD, how the massive rock temple was built in one night by nearly 20,000+ people using stones that were hand-carried from a quarry some 12 miles away, how this heiau became the war temple of Kamehameha the Great during the end of the 18th century, and — more significantly — the claim that “many tens of thousands” of people were ritually sacrificed here during the time when the Hawaiian Islands were ruled by the kapu (taboo) system.  This site was once considered so sacred that no one other than priests were allowed to visit it until 1978, when the centuries-old taboo was finally lifted to allow visitors. Continue Reading →